Solusi University
P.O. Solusi
Bulawayo, Zimbabwe
Admissions: admissions@solusi.ac.zw
General Info: info@solusi.ac.zw
Student Finance: sfo@solusi.ac.zw
+263 (09) 887 457
+263 (09) 885 484

DEPARTMENT OF AGRIBUSINESS

Chairperson

Busani Moyo

PhD, MSc, BSc

Lecturers

  • Busani Moyo – PhD, MSc, BSc
  • Letwine Hunyenyiwa – Mphil, MBA, BEd, Dip, Cert 
  • Phumelela Peace Mwelasi – MSc, BSc
  • Precious M. Tshabalala – MSc, BSc Hons
  • Lawrence Matshazi – MPhil, BSc
  • Musara Joseph – MSc, BSc 
  • Tafadzwa Haripo –  MSc, BSc

MISSION
The Department of Agribusiness exists to develop safe and sound scientific discoveries in economical agricultural production and marketing for aspiring regional and constituent entrepreneurs in Africa and elsewhere. The Department believes that true education points back to the Almighty and Redeemer of mankind.
PHILOSOPHY
From early simple societies to the modern complex interdependent system, humankind’s activities revolved around and are still centred on one main resource which is paramount for the sustenance of life: land. God Himself, the creator, endowed man with abilities to control the environment and placed man to purposefully and deliberately harness the natural resources for his (man’s) existence. In addition to this responsibility, humankind is blessed with physical, spiritual and mental abilities to decide on proper ways to bring honour and glory to God through faithful stewardship.
Agribusiness, as a field of knowledge, is current and relevant in addressing the source of humankind’s problems, that is, the production of food and preservation technologies. These two have been and still are a global concern. The study of Agribusiness, therefore, must lead to profitable ventures for individuals, organizations and the global economy at large. Agribusiness is the engine that fuels all other disciplines, and it is worth studying.
OBJECTIVES
The Department of Agribusiness aims at developing highly competent scientist and agricultural producers to serve the region and global constituencies in areas such as: Education, Economic Agricultural Production and Industry. This is done in the spirit as commissioned to Solusi University by the Seventh-day Adventist Church in the provisions of the Service Charter granted by the Government of the Republic of Zimbabwe. The main objectives of the Agribusiness department are:

  1. To provide an academic program with sufficient depth such that its graduates can meet the challenges of the job market and even remain competitive and qualified to pursue higher degrees of their choice without any prejudice.
  2. To equip students with skills to venture into profitable agricultural business from “anywhere to everywhere.
  3. To produce graduates that are not just employable but will become employers.

JOB & CAREER OPPORTUNITIES

Agribusiness graduates are in high demand in the Agriculture Sector as Extension Officers, Researchers, Agriculture Project Directors, Project Analysts, Consultants in private firms and Commercial Banks, Non-Governmental Organizations, Farm Managers, Lecturers in colleges or high schools. Furthermore, they can pursue graduate studies.
ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS
All applicants have to meet the following minimum requirements for admission prescribed under Solusi University general regulations:

  1. At least five (5) O-levels including English, Mathematics and a Science subject passed with a grade C or better.  
  2. In addition, applicants should have at least two appropriate combinations of A-level passes drawn from the following pool: Mathematics; Economics; Biology/Agriculture; Chemistry; Physics; Food Science, Geography or their approved equivalents.
  3. Applicants with a relevant Diploma in agricultural sciences or 3 year agricultural certificate from recognised college or institute plus five (5) approved O-levels including English, Mathematics and a Science subject passed with a grade C or better stand a chance to get admitted into the programme.    
  4. Applicants without ‘A’ Level Biology, Chemistry, and Mathematics will be mandated to take bridging courses in these subjects prior to proceeding to first year university courses. All students who are supposed to take bridging courses should upon departmental registration notify their course coordinators/advisors so that such classes can be arranged with relevant departments in the university.
  5. All international applicants must seek departmental clearance with regards to their qualifications upon which they may be required to take bridging courses.

 
    All students will be required to go for attachment for an attachment period of at least six (6) months and not more than eight (8) months as part of their fulfilment of the BSc. Agribusiness degree award requirements. Diploma holders (3-year diplomas) in relevant agricultural sciences may be exempted upon application by the student and departmental recommendations and senate approval.

GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS
To be eligible for graduation students must have successfully completed the following requirements:

Requirements
Credit Units
General Education 30
Core 86
Cognate 11
Elective 3
BSc Agribusiness Total Credits 130


BACHELOR OF SCIENCE AGRIBUSINESS DEGREE REQUIREMENTS

CORE COURSES

AGEC 201 - Agricultural Policy I (3 Credits)
Legal aspects of agriculture: taxation, contracts, property rights, buying and selling real estate, condemnation, land use regulations, leases, co-ownership, partnerships, corporations, commercial transactions, credit, liability, insurance, estate planning, water law, and agricultural regulations. A practical exposure to the legal institutions of Zimbabwe. 
AGAC 108 - Agribusiness Accounting (3 Credits)
This course introduces students to basic accounting principles and concepts applicable to an agribusiness firm. Exposure to journals, ledgers and financial statements. Topics of the accounting cycle, inventories, payrolls, accounts receivable, income taxes and potential use of computers will be covered.
AGEC 106 - Agricultural Economics (3 Credits)
This course covers an introduction to the economics of agriculture and appreciation of agricultural economics at farm, national, regional and international levels. The main focus of the course will be directed at farm (firm) level or the study of microeconomics. The course will deliberate on the applications of microeconomic principles to farm decision making; commodity markets and the rural economy. Students will learn to apply various economic principles and concepts relating to production agriculture, business management, consumer behaviour, market price analysis and equilibrium and agricultural policy formation. The course also introduces the economics of environmental and trade policies, supply chain principles and farm decision making from an economic perspective. Students are expected to grasp the basic economic problem of scarcity and rational decision making; the process of production, specialization and exchange; understand the principles of demand, supply and price determination; distinguish the effect on demand and supply of changes in various factors and the basics of production economics and their relation to the prevailing political economic environment. Additional topics may include the Agrarian Land Reforms in Zimbabwe before and after independence, rural development, natural resources, world food economics, international trade and policy, and monetary/fiscal policies.
AGEC 218 -Management of Agricultural Enterprises (3 Credits)
This course covers functions of management organisational theories, motivation and group dynamics, nature of decisions and plans, decision making and uncertainty, efficiency control of macro business,  Strategic development in agribusiness.  It also covers the organisation and management of agricultural enterprises, including units of production, power, equipment, use of records, marketing and other factors affecting management and attainment of maximum yields.  It also includes problem solving and sensitivity analysis
AGEC 304 - Agribusiness Finance (3 Credits)
This course covers in depth agricultural finance. Topics such as: Importance of Finance to Agribusiness; Time Value of Money; Capital Budgeting and Long-Term Decision Making; Financial Analysis, Planning, and Control; Risk in Agribusiness; Agriculture Credit; Legal Aspects of Agriculture Finance and Business Organization;  Analysis of financing and investment strategies for agribusiness firms and their effects on liquidity, solvency, and profitability. Analysis of financial institutions, markets, and instruments. Management problems, issues facing financial intermediaries serving agriculture. The purpose of this course is to become better able to make effective financial decisions.  These decisions may include personal financial condition or the financing and management of agricultural production and agribusiness.  Therefore, the subject matter covered in this course will relate to the use of certain financial tools and the understanding of concepts in making financial decisions. Successful completion of the course will enable students to:  Identify and define terms related to time value of money; Use a financial calculator to solve time value of money problems; apply the concept of time value of money to solve a variety of problems; Identify and define terms related to the types of capital budgeting methods; Formulate the appropriate cash flow projections for each method. Apply the capital budgeting methods to solve investment decision problems; Exhibit an understanding of financial statements used in agribusiness; Perform basic financial statement analysis; identify the sources of business and financial risk.
AGEC 310 - Agribusiness Practicum Lab (3 Credits)
AGEC 310 is the capstone course for Agribusiness Students. Students will work collaboratively with faculty and other students to plan develop and execute an agricultural production enterprise (agronomic, horticultural or animal-related). Successful completion requires student teams to work together to solve problems by drawing on their collective experience and knowledge of plant science, soil science animal science and agricultural business and marketing. It is supervised practical experience involving commercial project selection, planning, market research, implementation, advertising and marketing.  As part of the requirements for the course it includes submission of written report and an oral presentation.  The life of the project covers one to two semesters during the third year.  This course is a pre-requisite for the course ATWE 497 Attachment: Work Experience.
AGEC 316 - Analysis of Agricultural Projects (3 Credits)
This course covers the concept of an agricultural development project preparation and financing of project costs and benefits, and other measures of project worth.  The use of case studies and simple farm income analysis is also included. The fundamentals of agribusiness including concepts and tools of agribusiness, the structure of agribusiness, goals, strategies, objectives, plans, targets and tactics; the nature of decisions in agribusiness, organisation of production, process, storage and distribution of agricultural commodities, equipment and farm supplies.  It also includes a study of the basic elements of strategic planning and analytical sequence.
AGEC 318 - Agribusiness Computer Packages (3 Credits)
This course is a basic introduction to agriculture business computer applications in the workplace. The major objectives of this course include developing a thorough foundation of appropriate software terminology and proficiency with software commands; investigating elements of design and construction in the use of electronic spreadsheet, word processor, and presentation software and creating multiple agribusiness applications for each of the above mentioned software. Students use personal computers, software applications, databases software proficiency, including word processing, spreadsheets, databases, internet; and other software appropriate to agribusiness. Such software should be able to execute for example Executive Reporting, Commodity Manager, financial accounting, feed manufacturing and custom blending, fertilizer manager (Create fertilizer recommendations, formulas, mix sheets, batches, invoices, field history and maps) and so on. There are agribusiness software producers on the internet for example https://agvisionsoftware.com/ who have a range of software packages applicable to agribusiness management. In Zimbabwe agribusiness related software such as e-Hurudza has been developed.
AGEC 320 - Agricultural Marketing & Logistics (3 Credits)
This course is a study of marketing concept, marketing mix, futures markets, product, planning and development, organising of agricultural marketing and public relations, promotion and physical distribution of agricultural products and demand and elasticises of some named agricultural commodities and role of marketing in economic development. Operation and use of agricultural commodity markets and institutions as applied to enterprise and firm risk management. Cash; futures and futures option markets; basis; hedging; price discovery; fundamental analysis; and risk management strategies. Marketing of raw materials and processed products from the management perspective. Market structure, conduct, performance. Marketing channels.
AGEN 220 - Farm Machinery & Welding (3 Credits)
The course covers a wide spectrum of equipment used in the various branches of agriculture crops, horticulture, livestock, food or feed handling, storage and processing.  Theoretical aspects include an introduction to the aspects of force, work, simple mechanics, power transmission and sources of power.  Tillage equipment and the essential components of the internal combustion engine are also covered. Also included are farm machinery, depreciation, costs determinants, machine life depreciation, cost calibration and machine life, equipment and welding, simple tool making repair irrigation pipe, safety in the workshop and tractor driving.  It is recommended that the student obtain a class two driver’s licence.  A set of compulsory practical laboratory work will be done each week for the duration of the semester. Students will receive a comprehensive practical guide which they must read ahead of the practical or laboratory. This requires two hours theory and 3-6 hours of practical involvement per week.
AGEN 308 - Arid Agricultural System, Surveying & Irrigation (3 Credits)
This course covers field practices of irrigation, evapotranspiration, soil/moisture relationships, water measurement, pumps, wells, drainage, and sprinkler, drip, and surface systems covers principles of soil and moisture relationships, soil fertility, conservation, irrigation selection, suitability and design, irrigation scheduling. The course also deals with irrigation systems, surveying irrigation lands, power sources and pump selections. Student will be involved in irrigation and drainage problems concerning pumps, motors, sprinkler systems, pipe lines, ditches, and wells. The use of survey or levelling equipment will be applicable to this course. Laboratory work will be given as and when required.
AGRI 208 - Agricultural Extension & Rural Sociology(3 Credits)
This course is a study of agricultural extension as an educational process facilitated by fact finding needs identification, conducting surveys and utilizing the results in developing extension programmes.  The principles, impact and influence of sociology and social systems on food production and agriculture development are studied. Sociology and rural sociology,  extension education, agricultural  extension – Meaning and definitions Importance of rural sociology in agricultural extension and their  interrelationship characteristics of Zimbabwean rural society, differences and relationships between rural and urban societies. Social group/s – Classification, formation and organization of groups, role of social groups in agricultural extension Social stratification – Meaning, forms, class system and caste system . Culture, different cultural concepts and their role in agricultural extension social values, social control and attitudes – Types and their role in agricultural extension. Leadership – Meaning, classification of leaders, roles of a leader and different methods in selection of a leader.  Training of leaders-Lay and professional leaders, advantages and limitations in using local leaders in agricultural extension. Psychology and educational psychology – Meaning, scope and importance  Intelligence – Meaning, types, factors and importance in agricultural extension.  Personality – Meaning, types, factors and importance in agricultural extension. Perception, emotions, frustration – Meaning, types, factors and importance in agricultural extension. Motivation – Meaning, types of  motives, theories of motivation, importance of motivation in agricultural extension. Teaching, learning, learning experience, learning situation – Meaning and definition, elements of learning situation and its characteristics.  Principles of learning and their implications in teaching. Steps in extension teaching.Field trips are done as needed.
AGRI 202 - Agricultural Ecology & Wildlife Management (3 Credits)
This is an introductory course to modern agricultural systems, their evolution and wild life management.  It covers relationships among different farming systems and their ecologies in tropical Africa, energy efficiency of various agricultural systems and the contribution of non-conventional farming systems. Wildlife will be considered on their habitats and characteristics. The course also covers primary and secondary succession, ecological zones, identifying marks, use systems and activities. A field study involves visiting sites to identify agricultural practices, human settlements, identifying flora and fauna in appropriate areas. A herbarium is included in studying indigenous plant marks for different ecological zones.
AGRI 314 - Climate Change & Agriculture (3 Credits)
Agriculture and/or agribusiness are directly dependent on climate and attainment of food security is a climate related trajectory. “Warming of the climate system is unequivocal, as is now evident from observations of increases in global average air and ocean temperatures, widespread melting of snow and ice and rising global average sea level,” according to the UN’s Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC). Climate Change is a global environmental issue which has caused shifts and adjustments to agrarian practices. Negative effects of climate change have raised an alarm and a need to address this thematic issue. The purpose of this course is for the student to understand the impact climate change is having on agriculture as a whole, to farmers and ranchers, to be familiarized with tools to help adapt to risk and uncertainty, and to learn strategies for communicating these topics. The course will look at climate and weather trends of the recent past and examine the scientific basis for climate change and projections in the future. It will also examine agriculture’s role in reducing greenhouse gas emissions and discuss how agriculture might benefit from capture and utilization of these gases. Climate Change is a cross cutting theme that can be addressed from the earth sciences, environmental sciences, agricultural sciences and geopolitical sciences and so on. It is expected that the course will cover wide scope on climate change to help students realize the current operating environment and future prospects.
AGST 206 - Agricultural Statistics I (3 Credits)
An introduction to Biostatistics for Agriculture and Agri-business Students (Agricultural Statistics)  principles and procedures in the analysis of biostatistical data including indices of central tendency and dispersion; introduction to probability; normal distribution; sampling theory; hypothesis testing and significance tests, z-test, t-test, F-distribution; analysis of variance; and correlation and simple linear regression; and Non-parametric methods (chi-square (χ2) application). This subject provides a foundation in the basic practice of statistics, i.e. explaining variability. The orientation is towards the sciences covering both experimental and observational data. The emphasis is on understanding statistical concepts and applying acquired skills to data interpretation by the use of modern software packages. The modern approach to the teaching of statistics is used including group work, use of local data and small projects. A set of compulsory practical work (computer laboratory) will be done each week for the duration of the semester. Students will receive a comprehensive practical guide which they must read ahead of the practical or laboratory. Practical aspect covers the use of statistical packages in analysis (GENSTAT/STATA/EXCEL/MINITAB/SAS/ SPSS as some of the common statistical packages).
AGST 210 - Agricultural Statistics II (3 Credits)
This course builds on AGST 306 Agricultural Statistics I and gives students an opportunity of understanding of the principles and processes of agricultural research, agriculture being one of the major sciences. The course will provide students with a firm foundation in critical thinking, experimental design (CRD, RCBD, LSD, Split plot amongst others), factorial treatments (two-way), regression analysis (revisit), data analysis, interpretation and report writing. The course is intended to prepare students for the real world of research in agricultural sciences, and is intended to assist the scientist in the design, plot layout, analysis and interpretation of field and greenhouse experiments. Emphasis is placed on experimental designs used in agronomy and animal science research with more emphasis toward applied statistics rather than statistical theory. Students should be able to apply these principles in their final year research projects and be able to analyse their data with minimal supervision. A set of compulsory practical work (computer laboratory) will be done each week for the duration of the semester. Students will receive a comprehensive practical guide which they must read ahead of the practical or laboratory. Many numerical examples and problems will be presented and the recitation (practical component) will allow students to explore analysis using GENSTAT/STATA/EXCEL/MINITAB/SAS/ SPSS as some of the common statistical packages.
ANSC 102 - Livestock Handling Techniques (3 Credits)
This course covers practical aspects of relevant classes of livestock towards their improvement in production, health maintenance, while considering clinical and non-clinical manipulations, use of appropriate restraint and handling facilities, identification, castration, dehorning, and visit to auction sales, preparing animals for shows, showing and judging. This is a practical based course.
ANSC 214 - Anatomy & Physiology of Farm Animals (3 Credits)
This course seeks to provide learners with an understanding of the anatomy and physiology of farm animals. The anatomy and physiology of farm animals, histology and embryology is major emphasis. Emphasis also placed on normal development and function to provide a background for other animal science courses. All the major organ systems are studied with emphasis on control of mechanics of each system. The relevance of anatomy and animal physiology related to production and reproductions is included. Anatomy, physiology and histology of healthy organ systems formulate some of the laboratory work to be covered.
ANSC 306 - Animal Nutrition & Technology (3 Credits)
The course focuses on the nutrient requirements and feeding standards for various classes of livestock for production, lactation, growth work and maintenance It is an introduction to the principles of ruminant and monogastric nutrition. Feed requirements, feed laws, feed additives and labelling are also discussed. The course is designed to assist student in understanding nutrients in feeds; digestion of carbohydrates; lipids and proteins in ruminants and monogastrics; metabolism of carbohydrates, lipids and proteins; role of minerals and vitamins in animal nutrition; Analysis of Animal feeds; feeding standards; Ration formulation; feeding management. The course has the laboratory component which is compulsory.
ANSC 312 - Livestock Production Science & Health (3 Credits)
A study of history of breeds, breed characteristics adaptability, management and production of common farm livestock such as cattle, sheep, goats, horses, donkeys and poultry.  It also deals with breed selection, open and controlled breeding systems and overview of reproductive, digestive, circulatory systems, marketing, symptoms of health, disease ailments, immunity, diagnosis treatment and immunization. Fattening and animal welfare are also covered. Lab is given as required. Laboratory is given as required.
ATWE 497 - Attachment: Work Experience (3 Credits)
The course provides professional training and practice with emphasis on the practical side of operations at a commercial farm or enterprise.  The faculty member and the farm manager/operator will supervise the work activities.  A minimum of eight months of full-time work is required. It is accompanied by a written report.
CPSC 104 - Introduction to Soil Science (3 Credits)
The course introduces soil as a crop/plant growing medium. The physical, chemical and biological properties of soil or processes that occur within soil system are extensively evaluated. Soil origin, formation and classification systems, soil reactions influencing nutrient availability, Soil water relations, Soil Taxonomy and mineralogy, and soil conservation. Additional sections include: The major components of soil, including soil water, minerals, organic matter, and microorganisms; Soils in wetlands and arid regions; Cycling of nutrients and contaminants in soils; Soil quality, conservation, and sustainability and Soil carbon sequestration. Also include factors affecting availability of macro and micro nutrients in relation to productivity, soil testing calculations, soil enhancers and amendments, deficiency identification and correction and application methods. Importance of soils in agriculture and in Zimbabwe will be discussed. A set of compulsory practical laboratory work will be done each week for the duration of the semester. Students will receive a comprehensive practical guide which they must read ahead of the practical or laboratory. Practical skills will be developed which are required to determine and report soil qualities for the purpose of soil management/improvement monitoring..
CPSC 212 - Crop & weed Science (3 Credits)
The course introduces Crop and Weed Science as some of the important courses in crop sciences. Agribusiness students have to appreciate the science and art behind sustainable crop production principles. The agribusiness student has to learn to be mutually dependent on the other sectors in the branch of agriculture with realization that there are specialists in the field of crop sciences and their agronomy and as well as in the field of weed science. The course will cover the history and distribution of cultivated crops, classification systems, agronomy of selected four cereal grains, one tuber/root crop, one fibre, one sugar, two legumes and two special (e.g. cassava, jatrophar, etc) and the importance and role played by agricultural research in crop production. The Weed Science component will include a study of classification, identification, ecology, biology, morphology, distribution, economic importance and methods of control as a component of Integrated Weed Management (IWM). Lab given as needed.
CPSC 302 - Seed Science & Technology (3 Credits)
The course introduces Seed  as  a  basic  input  in  agriculture, introduction to seed (seed definition, seed morphology, anatomy and physiology, seed chemistry and seed importance);  Seed Quality (importance in crop production, seed production, importance of genetic purity in seed production); Seed Germination and Vigour; Seed Dormancy; Seed Rate; Seed Crop Cultivation; Principles of Storage; Seed Treatment; Seed Testing; Legislation (quality control of seed) and marketing as an agribusiness entity. The course seeks to introduce the scientific principles underlying seed science and technology against the backcloth of both the commercial (e.g. seed supply industry, crop establishment, weed control in crops) and non-commercial contexts (e.g. habitat restoration, ex situ biodiversity conservation) and interdependence of the agriculture sectors in promoting seed production. Laboratory work will be done following the international standards in seed science. A set of compulsory practical laboratory work will be done each week for the duration of the semester. Students will receive a comprehensive practical guide which they must read ahead of the practical or laboratory. Field trips to seed houses and/or laboratory facilities will help reinforce understanding of students in this course.
HORT 204 - Plant Anatomy, Physiology & Genetics (3 Credits)
The course introduces Seed  as  a  basic  input  in  agriculture, introduction to seed (seed definition, seed morphology, anatomy and physiology, seed chemistry and seed importance);  Seed Quality (importance in crop production, seed production, importance of genetic purity in seed production); Seed Germination and Vigour; Seed Dormancy; Seed Rate; Seed Crop Cultivation; Principles of Storage; Seed Treatment; Seed Testing; Legislation (quality control of seed) and marketing as an agribusiness entity. The course seeks to introduce the scientific principles underlying seed science and technology against the backcloth of both the commercial (e.g. seed supply industry, crop establishment, weed control in crops) and non-commercial contexts (e.g. habitat restoration, ex situ biodiversity conservation) and interdependence of the agriculture sectors in promoting seed production. Laboratory work will be done following the international standards in seed science. A set of compulsory practical laboratory work will be done each week for the duration of the semester. Students will receive a comprehensive practical guide which they must read ahead of the practical or laboratory. Field trips to seed houses and/or laboratory facilities will help reinforce understanding of students in this course.
HORT 216 - Olericulture (3 Credits)
This course introduces Vegetable production technology in Zimbabwe. Olericulture – definition – importance of vegetables in human nutrition and national economy – types of vegetable gardens;  Classification of vegetables based on botany, plant part used as vegetables, life cycle, seasons of growing and methods of culture. Nursery establishment and management of vegetable crops. Production technology of various vegetable crops and other fruit crops used commonly as vegetables. The vegetables crops to be covered include: Tomato, Eggplant (Brinjal), Chilli, Okra; Curcurbits-introduction-flowering and sex expression: Production technology of curcubits: cucumber, Ridge gourd and Bottle gourd; Snake gourd, bitter gourd, and ash gourd; water melon and musk melon; Crucifer production technology: Cabbage production technology, Cauliflower, knoll-khol and other crucifer production. Amaryallidaceae production technology: Onions and garlic production. Leguminaseae production technology: Common bean/dry bean production, cluster bean, garden pea, cowpea, dolicholis bean (field and garden bean). Production technology of root and tuber crops. Production technology of other common vegetables in Zimbabwe (for example Amaranthus spp). Labs will be organized as and when necessary.
REMT 390 - Research Methodology (3 Credits)
The course prepares the student to undertake research project.  It surveys different methods used in research approaches in the field of agricultural sciences. Students will learn and explore the basic principles of research methodology (the research cycle) and its various components. Emphasis will be placed on techniques used in identifying problems, forming hypotheses, constructing and using data-gathering instruments, designing research studies, and employing statistical procedures to analyse data. Each student is required to start working on their research proposal in preparation of their research project (REMT 490) which would be done during attachment (ATWE 497). A set of compulsory practical work (computer laboratory) will be done each week for the duration of the semester and also a compulsory research seminar would be held. Students will receive a comprehensive practical guide which they must read ahead of the practical (computer laboratory). A 3-hour examination will be written at the end of the course.
REMT 490 - Research Project (3 Credits)
This course provides students with an opportunity to enhance their understanding of the principles and processes of agricultural research in various subject areas (crop, animal, agricultural economics, agribusiness; agricultural engineering; food sciences). The course will provide students with a foundation in critical thinking, experimental design and data analysis that will be applicable to independent research project. Students will also explore the practical requirements and limitations of scientific research. Laboratory and field safety, animal care, intellectual property and research ethics will be reviewed. Students will be required to practice both oral presentation (done in seminars/poster presentations) and writing skills as core components of their evaluation. A seminar will be done to allow students present their scientific research results. The research project is intended to address current problems in agriculture. The research output should be publishable in the Solusi Research Journal (SURJ) and/or internationally renowned scientific/agribusiness journals.

ELECTIVE COURSES

FNCE 245-Insurance & Risk Management (3 Credits)
This course deals with the fundamentals of insurance and the insurance industry; concepts of risk and uncertainty; quantitative techniques of risk management; methods of dealing with risk; risk financing techniques, and risk management in insurance. In addition this course explores the principles of risk management and insurance. The course provides an understanding of the foundations, applications and selection of insurance. Fundamentals of life and health insurance as well as property and liability insurance will be included. Enterprise risk management for corporations, financial risk management, overview of employee benefits, and strategic policies to mitigate risk will also be covered.
FNCE 285-Investment & Portfolio Management (3 Credits)
A study of the techniques, vehicles and strategies for implementing investment goals in light of risk-return trade-offs. Key factors that determine the composition of the individual or the institutional portfolio are emphasized. Also included are theories and techniques for the management of portfolios with emphasis on the portfolio manager’s role in diversification, and meeting investor’s goals, risk evaluation, and portfolio analysis.
FNCE 265-Money & Banking (3 Credits)
A study of commercial banking, the operation and control of the banking system, and the Reserve Bank of Zimbabwe. Central banking system of selected African countries are discussed, as well as money and credit in circulation, and the effect of monetary policies.
FNCE 275-Intermediate Corporate Finance (3 Credits)
Includes analytical and decision-making approaches to challenges confronting financial management. Areas such as planning, control and financing of current operations (short-term financing), and long-term capital commitments, management of cash flow, evaluation of income-producing property and expansion are included. Also included is the cost of capital.
FNCE 290-Financial Modelling (3 Credits)
The course applies economic theories to solve various problems in financial management and investments. Using a hands-on approach in building financial spreadsheet models, the student will gain knowledge of numerical and graphical practices. These include but are not limited to asset return calculations, portfolio theory, index models, and the capital asset pricing model, option pricing models, bond pricing and investment performance analysis. MS Excel is the primary tool to implement these financial models; however the course will also make use of statistics and probability.
FNCE 295-Financial Derivatives (3 Credits)
The theory of futures and options pricing, and the application of the theory to develop a framework for analysing hedging and investment decisions using futures and options. Attention is given to practical concentrations in the use of these investments.
FNCE 310-Public Finance (3 Credits)
The theory of futures and options pricing, and the application of the theory to develop a framework for analysing hedging and investment decisions using futures and options. Attention is given to practical concentrations in the use of these investments.
FNCE 315-Iternational Financial Management (3 Credits)
A study of financial management and maintenance of international enterprises. Short – and long-term capital sources and uses are explored, as well as capital budgeting in changing foreign exchange conditions, exchange exposure coverage, taxation impacts, and global risks diversification.
FNCE 320-Advanced Corporate Finance (3 Credits)
An advanced study of the financial management of business firms. Special emphasis is placed on areas of major interest from both applied and theoretical points of view. Areas covered include capital budgeting, capital valuation, capital structure, mergers and acquisitions, leasing, international investments and financing decisions, cash flow estimation, and short-term asset management.
FNCE 325-Corporate Financial Strategy (3 Credits)
The course lays a lot of emphasis on the need for students to understand the issues surrounding corporate governance, goals and objectives of both public and private institutions in an economy, before exploring corporate strategies and strategic Business Units (SBUs) before considering valuation of the firm / equity using Discounted Cash Flow (DCF), Relative and Contingent Valuation Approaches. Topics such as Linking corporate to Financial Strategies, Valuation of the Firm / Equity, Approaches to Estimation of Beta and Growth Rate of the Firm, Short Term Financial Strategies are discussed in much detail based on mergers and acquisitions.

COGNATE COURSES

CHEM 121 - General Chemistry (3 Credits)
This course examines scientific methods, atomic and molecular structure, chemical bonding, states of matter, properties of gases, types of chemical reactions, energy changes in chemical reactions, stoichiometric relationships, radox reaction and equilibrium reactions, chemical kinetics, solution, acid-base, calculations associated with volumetric and gravimetric analysis; introduction to spectroscopic methods of analysis, electrochemistry, nuclear chemistry; and an introduction to the chemistry of carbon compounds.
CHEM 165 - Biochemistry (3 Credits)
This is a study of the chemical composition and reactions of biomolecules, which includes the position of biochemistry in the sciences, the organisation of cells; molecular nature of cellular components: the molecules of life, amino acids and peptides, carbohydrates, lipids, and nutrition; the dynamic aspects of biochemistry: thermodynamics, the three-dimensional structure of life, enzymes, hormones and neurotransmitters; metabolism: glycolysis, the citric acid cycle, photosynthesis, the metabolism and anabolism of nitrogen containing compounds; biosynthesis and structure of nucleic acids.
MATH 182 - Business Calculus (3 Credits)
This is an introduction to calculus of functions of one variable including finding extreme, partial derivatives, applications of continuous random variable and multivariate calculus.

GENERAL EDUCATION COURSES

Behaviour Development
CONV 111-412: CONVOCATION (0 Credits)
ORIE 100: ORIENTATION (0 Credits)
WOED 121-122: WORK EDUCATION (0 Credits)
Health and Physical Education
PHED 116: Physical Education (2 Credits)
HLED 115: Healthier Living (2 Credits)
Mathematics
MATH 181: Business Algebra (3 Credits)

Languages Communication
COMM 102: Communication Skills and Academic Writing (3 Credits)
Natural & Social Sciences
BIOL 389: Philosophical Biology (2 Credits)
HIST 276: Selected Themes in Zimbabwean History (2 Credits)
Computers
INSY 115: Computer Concepts & Applications(3 Credits)
Ethics and Philosophy
RELT 105: Christian Beliefs (3 Credits)
RELB 180: Studies in the Gospels (3 Credits)                                                                                                      RELT 355: RELIGION & Ethics in Modern Society (3 credits)
RELH 360: Seventh-day Adventist Heritage (2 Credits)
RELT 215: Philosophy of Christian Education (2 Credits)